Aditya L1 Successfully Launches from Sriharikota, Becoming India’s First Mission to Study the Sun

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Aditya L1 Successfully Launches from Sriharikota, Becoming India's First Mission to Study the Sun

Aditya L1 Successfully Launches from Sriharikota, Becoming India’s First Mission to Study the Sun

Aditya-L1 is the first space-based observatory to study the Sun, according to ISRO

ISRO launched the country’s ambitious solar mission, Aditya L1, on Saturday, looking to make history after its successful lunar expedition, Chandrayaan 3, a few days before.

The 44.4-meter-tall Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) ascended magnificently from this spaceport, located on the Eastern coast some 135 kilometers from Chennai, as the 23:40-hour countdown concluded.

For about 63 minutes, it will be the “longest flight” of the PSLV.
Aditya-L1 is the first space-based observatory to study the Sun, according to ISRO. After traveling 1.5 million kilometers from Earth in 125 days, the spacecraft is scheduled to be placed in a Halo orbit around the Lagrangian point L1, which is regarded closest to the Sun.

It will, among other things, relay images of the sun for scientific research.

Scientists believe that there are five Lagrangian sites (or parking lots) between the Earth and the Sun where a small object will tend to stay if placed there. The Lagrange Points are called after the prize-winning paper by Italian-French mathematician Joseph-Louis Lagrange, “Essai sur le Probl me des Trois Corps, 1772.”
These places in space can be used by spacecraft to stay there while using less fuel.

The gravitational pull of the two huge things (the Sun and the Earth) equals the centripetal force required for a tiny object to move with them at a Lagrange point.

Following the launch from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre here, the scientists will be involved in positioning the spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit, which will eventually be more elliptical.

The spaceship would be launched using onboard propulsion towards the Lagrange L1 point, exiting the Earth’s gravitational Sphere of Influence and cruising towards the L1. It would then be injected into a massive Halo Orbit around the L1 point close to the Sun.

According to ISRO, the Aditya-L1 Mission will take around four months from launch to reach the L1 point.

ISRO stated that the Sun generates radiation at practically all wavelengths, as well as different energetic particles and magnetic fields, which is why it is being studied.

The Earth’s atmosphere and magnetic field operate as a protective shield, blocking dangerous wavelength radiation. Solar investigations from space are conducted to identify such radiation.

The mission’s primary goals include comprehending Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration, initiating Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), near-Earth space weather, and solar wind dispersal.

The Aditya-L1 mission is carrying seven scientific payloads to conduct the research.

The solar corona and the behavior of CMEs will be studied using the Visible Emission Line Coronagraph (VELC).

After reaching the desired orbit, the primary payload, VELC, will send 1,440 photos per day to the ground station for analysis.

It is Aditya-L1’s “largest and technically most difficult” payload.

The Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope would image the solar photosphere and chromosphere in near ultraviolet light and measure variations in solar irradiance.

The solar wind and energetic ions, as well as the energy distribution, will be studied by the Aditya Solar Wind Particle Experiment (ASPEX) and Plasma Analyzer Package for Aditya (PAPA) payloads.

The Solar Low Energy X-ray Spectrometer (SLXS) and the High Energy L1 Orbiting X-ray Spectrometer (HEL1OS) will analyze the Sun’s X-ray flares over a wide X-ray energy range.

At the L1 point, the Magnetometer payload can measure interplanetary magnetic fields.

Aditya-L1 payloads are designed in-house with the close participation of multiple ISRO centers.

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